Welcome to 365 Days of Motoring

An Everyday Journey Through Motoring History, Facts & Trivia

Belt up and enjoy this 365-day ride as you cruise past the most momentous motoring events in history. Packed with fascinating facts about races, motorists and the history of the mighty engine, this is a must-visit web site for any car enthusiast.

On This Day


5th December

1893

123 years ago

The first electric car in Canada, a two-seater with padded seats and wire-spoke wheels, was completed by John Dixon Carriage Works in Toronto. A tiller with a throttle attachment steered the vehicle by turning the axle at mid-point. Drum brakes on the differential were used for stopping, and the 4-bhp electric motor was able to push the car to 15 mph for up to an hour before the batteries required recharging, It also had electric lights, a folding top and pneumatic tyres. Continue Reading →

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1911

105 years ago

Warren Johnson (63), inventor of the electric thermostat and manufacturer of Johnson tracks since 1905 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US, died. Johnson had an inquisitive mind and was particularly interested in electricity. In 1883, he developed a thermostat, which he deployed at the State Normal School. Continue Reading →

Warren Johnson

Warren Johnson

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1925

91 years ago

The paved track at Marouba Speedway, New South Wales, Australia, opened. It was reported to have had a capacity of 70,000. The 1 mile banked concrete bowl was the scene of some large and successful race meetings before a decline in attendances saw the track close in 1927, but reopened many times in the 1930s. Continue Reading →

Marouba Speedway (1934)

Marouba Speedway (1934)

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1932

84 years ago

The first Ford Model C car was introduced. Powered by the first 4 cylinder engine made by Ford with a counter-balanced crankshaft, it was largely eclipsed, however, by Ford's other 1932 offering: the Ford V8. The V8 was the first eight-cylinder Ford automobile, and boasted the first V8 engine block ever cast in a single piece.

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1933

83 years ago

Charles Nelson Pogue of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was issued with the first three United States patents for his Pogue Carburetor, said to increase gas mileage to as high as 200 mpg.

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1936

80 years ago

Austin W. Deyo (46), designer of the Larabee truck and an official of the Larabee-Deyo Motor Truck Company 1915-1917, died.

Larabee truck

Larabee truck

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1938

78 years ago

The Champion Spark Plug Company was reorganised in Delaware to succeed the original company founded in 1910. In 1989, Champion was purchased by Cooper Industries and is now a wholly owned brand of Federal-Mogul Corporation. Its main products are a line of spark plugs for a wide range of cars, trucks, SUVs, racing and marine applications. Continue Reading →

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1951

65 years ago

Chester S Ricker, a pioneer employee of Henderson and Stutz who was the official scorer for the first Indianapolis 500 race in 1911 and had performed this function at this event since, died aged 63.

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1951

65 years ago

The first push button-controlled Park-O-Mat garage opened in Washington, DC by Parking Services Inc. It had no ramps, no aisles and no lanes. Instead a single attendant, without entering a car, could automatically park or return a car in less than a minute. Continue Reading →

A modern descendant of the Park-O-Mat, the Volkswagen CarTowers, stacks cars in the Autostadt theme park, in Wolfsburg, Germany.

A modern descendant of the Park-O-Mat, the Volkswagen CarTowers, stacks cars in the Autostadt theme park, in Wolfsburg, Germany.

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1958

58 years ago

Prime Minster Harold Macmillan opened Britain’s first stretch of motorway, the 8-mile Preston bypass in Lancashire. The route of the bypass was designed as part of a north-south motorway, other lengths of which were under construction. The original bypass started in Walton-le-Dale at a roundabout on the Manchester-Preston Trunk Road a short distance south of the A49 junction, travelled by viaduct over the River Darwen and ended at a roundabout on the A6 a short distance south of Broughton.

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1960

56 years ago

Leyland Motors announced it would purchase Standard-Triumph International.

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1970

46 years ago

Highway administrators piled into a car and take a ceremonial drive through a paper ribbon at the entrance to the final segment, known as the West Leg, of the infamous Dan Ryan Expressway in Chicago. The road got its name from Cook County Chairman Dan Ryan, who had written the 1955 bond issue that directed many millions of dollars to the county's expressway-building fund. As of 2005 up to 307,100 vehicles use a portion of the Dan Ryan daily. Continue Reading →

Dan Ryan Expressway

Dan Ryan Expressway

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1973

43 years ago

The UK government imposed a compulsory 50-mph speed limit to save fuel during the Middle East oil crisis.

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1975

41 years ago

The funeral of former world champion Graham Hill was held at St Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire. Over 2,000 people attended - another 2,000 listened outside - and Jackie Stewart was among the pall bearers. "In an age which is short of joy, he brought happiness for millions, and in drawing out that happiness, he drew admiration for excellence and for character," said the Bishop of St Albans. Continue Reading →

Graham Hill

Graham Hill

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1977

39 years ago

The Plymouth Horizon was introduced, the first American-made small car with front-wheel drive. Technical advances in drive technology had reduced the size and cost of front-wheel drive systems.

Plymouth Horizon

Plymouth Horizon

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1999

17 years ago

Don Panoz, founder of Panoz Auto Development, was presented with the John Bolster Award for technical excellence at the Autosport Awards Banquet for successfully bringing front-engined cars back to top-flight sportscar racing.

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2002

14 years ago

Gloomy times in the F1 business. Days after Jaguar announced 76 redundancies, Arrows laid off 130 jobs at their Leafield base as a result of them being refused an F1 entry. The news came as another blow to the industry which was struggling to come to terms with falling sponsorship revenues and declining TV audiences across the globe.

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2007

9 years ago

McLaren was forced into an embarrassing climb-down for falsifying information on the eve of an FIA World Motor Sport Council meeting in Monte Carlo, which was about to decide if Renault was guilty of using McLaren secrets. McLaren had claimed that former engineer Steve Mackereth took 780 technical drawings with him when he joined Renault the previous year, but admitted there were only 18 drawings and that nine employees, rather than the implied 18, had seen the sensitive data. Asked if what had become known as Spygate II had harmed damaged the sport, FIA president Max Mosley said: " "I don't think it's done any damage. Continue Reading →

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