Welcome to 365 Days of Motoring

An Everyday Journey Through Motoring History, Facts & Trivia

Belt up and enjoy this 365-day ride as you cruise past the most momentous motoring events in history. Packed with fascinating facts about races, motorists and the history of the mighty engine, this is a must-visit web site for any car enthusiast.

On This Day


1st October

1847

173 years ago

The world's first sale of pneumatic tires was made to Lord Lorane of Albany Park, Guilford, England. The rotting remains of the tires, built to the design of Robert William Thomson, are now owned by the Dunlop Rubber Company.

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1883

137 years ago

Benz & Company Rheinische Gasmotoren-Fabrik, usually referred to as, Benz & Cie, was founded by Karl Benz, FriedrichWilhelm Esslinger and Heinrich Kleyer in in Mannheim, Germany. The company gave Benz the opportunity to indulge in his old passion of designing a horseless carriage. Based on his experience with, and fondness for, bicycles, he used similar technology when he created an automobile with a four-stroke engine of his own design between the rear wheels. Continue Reading →

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1896

124 years ago

The first Mercedes truck, of 1.5 tons payload, was sold to London's British Motor Syndicate Ltd. Its rear-mounted Phoenix engine produced 4 hp at 700 rpm.

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1896

124 years ago

The Austrian Automobile, Motorcycle and Touring Club was founded.

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1899

121 years ago

'Levegh' driving a Mors 16 hp won the 163 mile (262.5 km) Bordeaux-Biarritz road race in a time of 4 hours 24 minutes.

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1903

117 years ago

The Ford Motor Company was immediately profitable. Less than 4 months after its formation it announced profits of almost $37,000 and a dividend of 10%. An additional dividend of 20% was paid at the beginning of 1904, and another 68% in June 1904. Continue Reading →

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1908

112 years ago

The Ford Model T was introduced to the American public, and Ford's affordable revolution had begun. Beginning in 1903, Henry Ford and his engineers struggled for five difficult years to produce a reliable, inexpensive car for the mass market. It wasn't until the 20th attempt, christened the Model T after the 20th letter in the alphabet, that the fledgling Ford Motor Company hit pay dirt. Continue Reading →

Ford Model T (1910)

Ford Model T (1910)

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1908

112 years ago

The first Ford overseas sales branch opens in Paris, France.

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1909

111 years ago

Ford opened a sales company in London, England.

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1910

110 years ago

The Vanderbilt Cup was won by Harry Grant in an ALCO-6. The race was held at the Long Island Motor Parkway, the first US roadway designed for motor vehicle use. Privately built by William Kissam Vanderbilt with overpasses and bridges to remove intersections, it opened in 1908 as a toll road and closed in 1938 when it was taken over by the state of New York in lieu of back taxes. Continue Reading →

Ralph Beardsley, American racecar driver, in “Simplex”, Vanderbilt cup 1910

Ralph Beardsley, American racecar driver, in “Simplex”, Vanderbilt cup 1910

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1911

109 years ago

Ford opened its first an assembly plant outside North America, a former tram factory in Trafford Park, Manchester, England, employing 60 staff to assemble the Ford Model T. The need to import parts from the American mid-west must have complicated the assembly process, since the Trafford Park plant quickly took to purchasing components on its own account far closer to home. For two years bodies were delivered to the Trafford Park assembly location individually on handcarts from a firm of body builders called Scott Brothers, located down the road. Continue Reading →

Model T Ford production at Trafford Park 1914

Model T Ford production at Trafford Park 1914

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1912

108 years ago

David Bruce-Brown (25), an American racecar driver, was killed during practice for the 1912 American Grand Prize and Vanderbilt Cup races held in Milwaukee.

David Bruce-Brown

David Bruce-Brown

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1913

107 years ago

Eugene J. Farkas was put in charge of the experimental drafting room of the Ford Motor Company.

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1915

105 years ago

The Henry Ford Hospital opened in Detroit, Michigan, US.

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1925

95 years ago

Dodge Brothers, Inc., acquired a 51% interest in Graham Brothers, Inc., for $13 million and the remaining 49% on May 1, 1926. The three Graham brothers, Robert, Joseph and Ray, assumed management positions in Dodge Brothers before departing early in 1927.

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1927

93 years ago

The II Royal Automobile Club Grand Prix, commonly referred to as the 1927 British Grand Prix was held at the Brooklands circuit. It was the fifth and final race of the 1927 AIACR World Manufacturers' Championship season. The race was won by French driver Robert Benoist, his fourth victory from the season's five races, a performance that ensured his Delage team won the Championship.

Robert Benoist on his way to winning the 1927 British Grand Prix at Brooklands

Robert Benoist on his way to winning the 1927 British Grand Prix at Brooklands

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1929

91 years ago

The 1930 Nash Motor Company's model range were introduced, including the new top-of-the-line Series 490. It was powered by the company's first eight-cylinder motor, a twin-ignition eight, that developed 100 hp. The wheelbase of the senior series Nash automobiles was lengthened to 124 and 133 inches making them the largest Nashes built to date. Continue Reading →

Nash Series 490

Nash Series 490

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1931

89 years ago

Oxford Street’s new traffic lights in London were reported to speed up evening rush-hour traffic by 90 per cent.

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1931

89 years ago

Production began at Ford’s Dagenham Plant in east London, then Europe’s largest factory. The first vehicle to roll off the production line was a Model AA truck. Planning of the Dagenham plant began in the early 1920s, a time when lorries were small and road networks little developed. Continue Reading →

Ford  Dagenham

Ford Dagenham

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1933

87 years ago

The 1934 Nash Motor Company's model range were introduced featuring new styling by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky

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1936

84 years ago

At the Paris Motor Show, Citroën presented its first diesel-powered light utility vehicles: the 500DI (500 kg diesel), the 850DI (850 kg diesel) and the 23DI (1,500 kg diesel). The vehicles had a 7 bhp rating and were equipped with a high-turbulence, indirect-injection (1.767 L) engine with 4 cylinders developing 40 bhp at 3,650 rpm.

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1939

81 years ago

Buses began replacing trams in Sydney, Australia and heralded the end of the tram network. Melbourne resisted and has kept its trams running.

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1940

80 years ago

The Pennsylvania Turnpike, America's first example of a toll superhighway, officially opened for service on this day. The year before, this new form of superhighway was featured at the 1939 New York City's World Fair, and was greeted by skepticism by many groups who doubted the merits of the extravagant project. Inspired by Germany's 100 mph autobahns, the Pennsylvania Turnpike was constructed at great expense to serve the needs of its users, levelling any terrain obstructions that hindered efficient travel along the limited-access superhighway. Continue Reading →

Pennsylvania Turnpike

Pennsylvania Turnpike

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1943

77 years ago

The GMC Truck & Coach Division of General Motors was created from the former Yellow Truck & Coach Manufacturing Company.

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1947

73 years ago

Austin unveiled the A40, to replace the ‘8’ and ‘10’ models. The rear wheel driven saloon was powered by a naturally aspirated engine of 1.2 litre capacity. Continue Reading →

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1954

66 years ago

Packard purchased Studebaker, creating the Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

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1955

65 years ago

The Ohio Turnpike opened to the public. Plans for the turnpike began in 1947 when Senator Ralph Winter of Lodi introduced a bill for a privately financed Ohio roadway like the famed Pennsylvania Turnpike, considered the first-ever U.S. Continue Reading →

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1959

61 years ago

General Motors stylists began developing the XP-727, a clay mock-up that would evolve into the front wheel drive 1967 Cadillac Eldorado sport coupe.

XP-727

XP-727

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1961

59 years ago

Rex White passed pole-sitter Junior Johnson just past halfway to win the Wilkes 200 at North Wilkesboro (North Carolina, US) Speedway. White, a 28-time winner and the 1960 champion in NASCAR’s premier series, led the final 81 laps on the .625-mile asphalt track, outrunning second-place Fireball Roberts by a full lap at the finish. Richard Petty finished third with Johnson fourth.

Rex White

Rex White

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1963

57 years ago

The Pontiac GTO was introduced as an option package for the deluxe Tempest, available with the two-door coupe, hardtop, and convertible body styles. The US$295 package included a 389 cu in (6 l) V8 rated at 325 bhp (242 kW) at 4800 rpm with a single Carter AFB four-barrel carburetor and dual exhaust, chromed valve covers and air cleaner, seven-blade clutch fan, a floor-shifted three-speed manual transmission with Hurst shifter, stiffer springs, larger diameter front sway bar, wider wheels with 7.50 × 14 redline tires, hood scoops, and GTO badges. Continue Reading →

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1964

56 years ago

The first traffic to use the new £5-million Leicestershire (England) section of the M1 was led by two white, police-patrol Jaguars, which travelled from Misterton to Crick at 7.30 am for the official opening.

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1964

56 years ago

The 1965 Ford Mustangs were officially introduced, including the new 2+2 fastback coupe. The standard interior features of the 1965 Mustang included adjustable driver and passenger bucket seats, an AM radio, and a floor mounted shifter in a variety of color options. Ford added additional interior options during the 1965 model year. Continue Reading →

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1964

56 years ago

Ferrari introduced the 275 GTB at the Paris Motor Show. Citroen presented the Ami 6 Estate and offered safety belts as an option on all models.

Ferrari 275 GTB

Ferrari 275 GTB

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1967

53 years ago

Richard Petty beat Dick Hutcherson by two laps at North Wilkesboro, to win his milestone 75th NASCAR Grand National Series race, and record his 10th consecutive victory. The race was also his record 27th race win of the 1967 season. Petty's consecutive race winning streak (10), single-season win total (27), and career victories (200) are all NASCAR records that still stand as of 2015. Continue Reading →

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1967

53 years ago

Jim Clark finished six seconds ahead of Lotus teammate Graham Hill after nursing his limping car through the final two laps, to win his third and final American Grand Prix. It was the Scot's third win of the season, and the twenty-third of his career. The following April, Clark was killed in a Formula Two race in Germany, but two more wins (in Mexico and South Africa) had already made him the driver in Grand Prix history to win 25 Grands Prix, one more than Argentina's Juan Manuel Fangio.

Jim Clark in a Lotus 49 - 1967 United States Grand Prix

Jim Clark in a Lotus 49 - 1967 United States Grand Prix

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1968

52 years ago

The 1969 AMC models were introduced, including the last cars to bear the historic Rambler name.

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1969

51 years ago

Austin 1300GT and Morris 1300GT were both launched (OTR £910) in Britain.

Austin 1300GT

Austin 1300GT

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1970

50 years ago

The Citroën GS, part of a new wave of forward thinking European saloons that rode on a crest of a wave with cars such as the Alfasud and Fiat 128, was introduced in Paris. However, as appealing as the GS was to drive, thanks to its supple suspension and willing air cooled flat-fours that could be thrashed all day long, it was a flawed gem, and failed to sell significantly outside of France. Citroën brought its big car Hydropneumatic technology to the small car market with the GS, and that was central to its appeal, especially on undulaing roads. Continue Reading →

Citroën GS

Citroën GS

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1976

44 years ago

The Bristol Britannia was introduced as the successor to the Bristol 603.

Bristol Britannia

Bristol Britannia

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1978

42 years ago

Carlos Reutemann won the US Grand Prix, the fourth and final win in his last season before leaving Ferrari, while championship leader Mario Andretti, driving the JPS team's second car after an accident in practice, retired when his engine blew.

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1979

41 years ago

Rear fog lamps become mandatory in Britain for most vehicles manufactured after this day and used from 1 April 1980.

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1980

40 years ago

The Rolls Royce Silver Sprite was introduced to replace the Silver Shadow. It was the first of a new generation of models for the company and formed the basis for the Flying Spur, Silver Dawn, Touring Limousine, Park Ward and apart from branding differences and a different radiator housing also Bentley for the Mulsanne/Eight series. The Spirit was not entirely new – it continued to use the basic design of the Silver Shadow as well as that motor car's 6.75 L (6750 cc/411 in³) V8 engine and GM sourced THM 400 3-speed automatic transmission. The Spur / Spirit continued the emphasis toward a high degree of ride quality by utilising the self-leveling suspension from the previous model Silver Shadow, though in this application using a Girling automatic hydraulic ride height control system and gas-charged shock absorbers.

Rolls Royce Silver Sprite

Rolls Royce Silver Sprite

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1982

38 years ago

Warren Johnson set an NHRA Pro Stock 1/4-mile top speed record when he ran 181.08 mph at Fremont, California, USA, the first Pro Stock racer to exceed 180 mph.

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1985

35 years ago

Ninian Sanderson (60), winner of the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans, died from cancer in Glasgow, Scotland. He cut his racing teeth in the highly competitive 500cc Formula 3 class in the early 1950s and is best known for winning the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans for the Ecurie Ecosse team, together with Ron Flockhart in an ex-works Jaguar D-Type. The following year Sanderson again competed for Ecurie Ecosse, finishing second with co-driver John "Jock" Lawrence, only beaten by the other Ecurie Ecosse D-Type driven by Flockhart and Ivor Bueb. Continue Reading →

Ninian Sanderson

Ninian Sanderson

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1986

34 years ago

Andy McVann (21) of indie group, The Farm died when he lost control of his car during a high speed police chase.

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1988

32 years ago

Sir Alec Issigonis, Greek-British designer of the Morris Minor and the Mini, knighted in 1969, died at his home in Edgbaston, Birmingham aged 81.

Alec Issigonis

Alec Issigonis

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1989

31 years ago

A new accompanied motorcycle test was introduced in Britain. Prompted by alarming accident figures, the old-style ‘part 2’ motorcycle test, where the examiner stood by the roadside, was replaced by the new, more demanding ‘pursuit test’. The examiner now followed the candidate on a motorcycle and maintained radio contact during the test.

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1989

31 years ago

A flag-to-flag victory for Ayrton Senna in a McLaren at the Spanish Grand Prix only came after he held of a determined challenge from the Ferrari of Gerhard Berger. Alain Prost, who took third, still held a commanding lead in the drivers' championship, but team-mate Senna's victory kept him in the hunt. "It was Mission Impossible," Prost said. Continue Reading →

1989 Spanish Grand Prix

1989 Spanish Grand Prix

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1989

31 years ago

Dick Johnson and John Bowe drove a Ford Sierra to victory in the Toohey's 1000 at Mount Panorama in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia.

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1995

25 years ago

Damon Hill conceded the title was Schumacher's after crashing out of the European Grand Prix on the ninth lap. He had a tight battle for third with Schumacher before he clipped a curb, span and piled into a barrier. Schumacher went on to take the chequered flag with a brilliant drive, leaving him 27 points clear of Hill with only 30 left up for grabs.

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1995

25 years ago

Mark Martin held off Rusty Wallace to win the Tyson Holly Farms 400 at North Wilkesboro, North Carolina (US). Ernie Irvan, made his first NASCAR Winston Cup start since his terrible accident in August 1994 at Michigan, leading 31 laps and finished seventh.

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1996

24 years ago

The driving theory test pass mark in the UK was raised from 26/35 to 30/35.

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2002

18 years ago

The Durham City congestion charge, the first congestion charge to be introduced in the UK, commenced. Durham County Council introduced the £2 toll for drivers using 1,000-year-old Saddler Street in the city centre between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm Monday to Saturday. This is the only public access road leading to the World Heritage Site of Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Continue Reading →

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2004

16 years ago

The City of Los Angeles, California offered free parking to all hybrid electric vehicles, extending an existing offer of free parking for all pure electrical vehicles.

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2004

16 years ago

The AA left the Centrica group, following its acquisition for £1.75 billion by two leading European private equity firms, CVC and Permira.

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2005

15 years ago

The Ford Focus ST became available to order in the UK.

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2011

9 years ago

The MINI Cooper Coupe, MINI Cooper S Coupe, and MINI John Cooper Works Coupe went on sale worldwide. The MINI Cooper Coupe was $22,000, the MINI Cooper S Coupe was $25,300, and the MINI John Cooper Works Coupe was $31,900 (including a $700 destination charge).

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2012

8 years ago

VDL NedCar announced that it has signed a contract to build future MINI models in Born, The Netherlands.

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2013

7 years ago

A Tesla Model S caught fire after the vehicle hit metal debris on a highway in Kent, Washington, US. Tesla confirmed the fire began in the battery pack and was caused by the "direct impact of a large metallic object to one of the 16 modules within the Model S battery pack."

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2014

6 years ago

The tax disc was no longer required to be displayed on vehicles in the UK. A computerised system was used instead.

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2017

3 years ago

Parisians and tourists were encouraged to stroll through the City of Light as officials banned cars from its streets for a day. Only emergency vehicles, buses and taxis were allowed on the streets from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m.

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2017

3 years ago

A Koenigsegg Agera RS set an unofficial record for 0–400–0 km/h (0–249–0 mph) with a time of 36.44 seconds. The record was set at the Vandel Airfield in Denmark and broke the record of 42 seconds set by the Bugatti Chiron a few weeks prior.

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